NCDP Clips for Friday, July 10th, 2015


NCDP Clips for Monday, July 13th, 2015

Tweet of The Day

DECIDING JIM CROW’S 21st CENTURY FATE

Federal trial in NC voting rights case scheduled to begin (AP) — A voting rights trial stemming from three federal lawsuits challenging provisions of a 2013 North Carolina law is getting under way.

What’s being argued about 4 provisions in NC voting law (AP) — The four provisions in North Carolina’s 2013 elections overhaul law to be scrutinized during a federal trial starting Monday in Winston-Salem, with a sampling of the arguments contained in the attorneys’ pretrial briefs: — Reduction of the number of early-voting days before each primary and general election from 17 days to 10.

LEGISLATURE 2015

Legislative holdup on funding teacher assistants causing problems for schools(Fayetteville Observer) — This year, in early July, N.C. House Speaker Tim Moore said it would likely take several weeks for the House and Senate to iron out their budget differences. Legislators then headed home for a 10-day break. They return to work Monday. Meanwhile, with public school instructional assistant funding in question, the fiscal year underway and the school year fast-approaching, some school districts have already laid off TAs.

POLICY & POLITICS

ACA event helps migrant workers sign up for health insurance (WRAL-TV) — Migrant workers were able to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act at an event in Dunn on Sunday.

What Are the Limits of ‘Religious Liberty’? (New York Times) — We’ve arrived at an unfortunate impasse over the meaning of religious liberty. Unlike in earlier eras, when religious objections let the faithful separate themselves from institutions they felt they could not support, many conservatives now deploy the phrase as a way of excluding other people.

End of 2016 Election Closer Than You Think (Politico) — We like to think that presidential elections are dramatic fall campaigns pitting party against party, but the truth is that the most decisive moments often occur long before the general election kicks off. If history is any guide, the outcome of next year’s presidential campaign will likely be determined before the Republican Party has even selected their nominee. That uncomfortable fact means that the longer and more divisive the Republican primary, the less likely the party will be to win back the White House in 2016.

EDITORIALS

Silenced N.C. voters deserve help (Charlotte Observer column) — A federal judge hears arguments on N.C. voter law starting Monday

Defending public education (Winston-Salem Journal column) — When public education has to defend itself against the state’s General Assembly in order to function effectively, those in government should reassess their priorities as elected officials.

The Confederate myths too many Americans believe (Raleigh News & Observer column) — James W. Loewen: So many Americans believe myths about the Civil War and the Confederacy because textbooks and monuments are wrong.