NCDP Clips 7/5

General Assembly News

True colors of legal notices bill now clear
N&O // Editorial // June 30, 2017

Summary: "There never really was any mystery about why Republican Sen. Trudy Wade of Guilford County sponsored the original bill to allow website-only publication of legal notices, thus taking the business away from newspapers, where they have traditionally had to be published."

  • "This longstanding policy was of benefit to people, and of harm to no one. But then Sen. Wade got mad at being criticized in the state’s press, so she legislated against newspapers.

Judiciary could be the next target for GOP redistricting
N&O // Editorial // June 30, 2017

Summary: "State House Republicans, who’ll undoubtedly be joined by those in the Senate, are trying to rearrange the state’s judicial districts — those wherein people elect district attorneys and judges — to give themselves a partisan advantage. The move has been delayed, but a special redistricting session is likely."

  • "Gov. Roy Cooper pretty much pegged this one: “This is an attempt to threaten the judiciary and rig the judiciary in their favor.” Point, game, set, match."
  • "In this case, the judicial redistricting, totally unneeded, would divide some single urban districts into multiple smaller districts, the better, Republicans figure, for them to capture more judgeships for the GOP.
  • "This is preposterous, an attempt to completely politicize judicial elections."

Cities already planning local Sunday liquor rules as the ‘Brunch Bill’ becomes law
N&O // Colin Campbell, Will Doran, Matthew Adams, and Charles Duncan // July 1, 2017

Summary: "The ink was barely dry after the governor signed the so-called brunch bill into law before the Carrboro Board of Aldermen called a special meeting for Monday to allow alcohol sales starting at 10 am. on Sundays."

Law allows for two more hours of Sunday alcohol sales
Robesonian // Mike Gellatly // July 5, 2017

Summary: "The regulation of Sunday alcohol sales in North Carolina has been relaxed with the stroke of the governor’s bill, but it will be up to local governments to decide if there will be an additional two hours on church day to enjoy a cold one."

No voter ID revival before lawmakers left Raleigh
N&O // Colin Campbell // July 1, 2017

Summary: "No voter ID bills were introduced during North Carolina’s just-concluded legislative session, and it’s unclear when lawmakers might revisit the issue."

Legislature adjourns without touching gun permit mandates
N&O // Craig Jarvis, Colin Campbell, and Will Doran // July 1, 2017

Summary: "The state Senate took no action on a late-session surprise bill proposed to essentially do away with concealed handgun permits."

Legislative session filled with hits, misses
WRAL // Matthew Burns // July 1, 2017

Summary: "State lawmakers left Raleigh early Friday after a 93-day legislative session in which they fulfilled their constitutional obligation to pass a budget for the coming year and accomplished several other goals on the Republican majority’s agenda."

North Carolina Republicans continue to meddle in education
N&O // Editorial // July 2, 2017

Summary: "When Republican Mark Johnson, a 33-year-old former Forsyth County school board member, upset incumbent state Superintendent of Public Instruction June Atkinson, a Democrat, in the 2016 election, Republicans in the General Assembly were rubbing their hands together so hard they could have started a forest fire."

  • "In the latest example of legislative meddling, a budget mandate reported by N.C. Policy Watch, a project of the N.C. Justice Center, would fire several education officials from the administration of Atkinson, and would eliminate a top staff member’s position with the State Board of Education, which by statute has charge of policy. Martez Hill is the board’s executive director."
  • "Republicans seem determined to dismantle the public education system that has served North Carolina well for over 100 years. In fact, it may be said that the state’s strong public schools transformed it, giving hope to millions of young people and opening their lives to the endless possibilities that education should inspire. Why GOP leaders want to meddle in and damage public schools remains a mystery, given that the majority of North Carolina families have their children in public schools."

Solar compromise passes despite shade
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 31, 2017

Summary: "A compromise bill to overhaul solar policy in North Carolina is on its way to the governor. But critics say wind energy paid too high a price for the deal…The final deal includes an 18-month moratorium – through the end of 2018 – on issuing any state permits for wind farms. No exceptions are made for the Timbermill Wind and Alligator River wind projects currently in development."

  • "Sponsor Rep. John Szoka, R-Cumberland, conceded that it wasn’t the bill that left the House, but he said the solar provisions would still benefit utility customers, adding that "85 percent of something" is better than nothing."

Fayetteville’s lawmakers win some, lose some
Fayetteville Observer // Paul Woolverton // July 1, 2017

Summary: "Cumberland County’s six lawmakers had plenty to celebrate when the “long session” of the General Assembly gaveled out at 2:09 a.m. Friday. After all, they brought millions of dollars for projects in Fayetteville and Cumberland County."

  • "Sen. Wesley Meredith proposed legislation to prepare North Carolina for self-driving vehicles, which are in development."
  • "Szoka passed legislation to modify electric utility regulations to make it more affordable for residents and businesses to install solar power on their properties. "
  • "Cumberland County Rep. John Szoka’s plan to foster rural internet expansion passed the House but is trapped in the Senate."

Our View: Take politics out of our judicial system
Fayetteville Observer // Editorial // July 2, 2017

Summary: "Sometimes a bad idea becomes a gift that keeps on giving. So it is with the General Assembly’s attempt to politicize key institutions and its penchant for extreme political gerrymandering of North Carolina."

  • "The gerrymandering has already been slapped down in the courts for its racial biases and it’s even made this state a poster child for a national movement to make redistricting less political. There have even been a few hints that the U.S. Supreme Court may be ready to reconsider its long-held view that redistricting is an inherently political process. We would welcome that decision. But that has done little to dampen legislative leaders’ drive to make it impossible to dislodge the Republican Party’s iron grip on the state’s government (despite the fact that Republican is the third-ranking voter registration in North Carolina, behind Democrat and unenrolled)."
  • "now, yet another push into politics for our judiciary: a proposal to redraw the judicial and prosecutorial districts across the state."
  • "We’d like to see the General Assembly drop its judicial gerrymandering and instead let the people decide how we choose judges — and whether political affiliation should have anything to do with it. We need fair, unbiased judicial decision-making at every level. And that’s not what our legislative leaders are trying to give us."

Democrats’ protests futile till gerrymandering ends
Star News // Editorial // July 2, 2017

Summary: "North Carolina’s new budget was officially approved last week, but it was signed off on last November, when voters again gave Republicans veto-proof majorities in the General Assembly.If anyone was surprised by the spending plan and tax cuts for corporations, they either are uninformed or fooling themselves."

Zombie bills, like judicial gerrymandering, should stay entombed in committee
WRAL // Editorial // July 5, 2017

Summary: "Since 2011 no legislation, it seems, ever dies. These bills are zombie-like. They don’t get the support to pass, but they are never really dead. They haunt the legislature and spring-up when opposition is most vulnerable."

  • "Such is the case with state Rep. Justin Burr’s clandestine effort to redraw the state’s lines for superior court, district court and prosecutorial districts."
  • "Like the way of all zombies, Burr’s bill deserves to be decapitated and left to remain well-entombed in a legislative committee and not to be heard of again."

Editorial: Irrational opposition to wind energy jeopardizes state’s clean energy economy
WRAL // Editorial // July 4, 2017

Summary: "State Sen. Harry Brown of Onslow County says the Pentagon is lying to North Carolina.The U.S. Defense Department has repeatedly, officially, stated that two key wind energy projects proposed in the eastern part of the state are NOT a threat to the training going on at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base or the Marine Corps Air Station at Cherry Point. But Brown says he knows better."

  • "Brown is using his powerful post as Senate Budget chairman to impose his irrational opposition to the reasonable and responsible development of wind energy in the state."

Sand, dredging, bag ban bills left hanging as lawmakers depart
The Outer Banks Voice // Kirk Ross // July 5, 2017

Summary: "Going into the final day of the 2017 long session last week, the fate of dozens of environmental provisions, some in multiple bills, was still an unknown."

  • "Also among the amendments proposed but not yet voted on is a move by Rep. Beverly Boswell, R-Dare, to add a provision to repeal the plastic bag ban in Outer Banks beach communities. "

Campus free-speech bill heads to Cooper; why Durham and Orange lawmakers voted no
Herald Sun // Ray Gronberg // July 3, 2017

Summary: "After further legislative tinkering to give university leaders more control over their institutions, a “campus free speech” bill for the UNC system cleared the N.C. General Assembly on the session’s penultimate day and now awaits Gov. Roy Cooper’s signature."

Dust settles at West Jones Street, with scores of legislation sent to Cooper’s desk
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 30, 2017

Summary: "After a flurry of activity that began with a veto override, lawmakers adjourned their regular legislative session a little after 2am on Friday morning just ahead of the Independence Day holiday and a looming court order on redistricting."

  • Convention of states – "In April, the Senate initiated the process in a successful bid, but the House version — championed by Reps. Bert Jones (R-Rockingham) and Dennis Riddell (R-Alamance) — fell short when more than a dozen conservative members voted red."

2017 legislative acts that could affect the bottom line
North State Journal // Jeff Moore // June 30, 2017

Summary: " With the long legislative session officially adjourned, lawmakers departed Jones Street having passed a roughly $23 billion budget, overridden half a dozen gubernatorial vetoes, and passed laws that will affect businesses large and small. Tax cuts, regulatory reform, and economic development were among the dozens of legislative acts of 2017 that could translate to the bottom line."

  • "Businesses’ workers’ compensation liabilities were also reformed with an amendment by Sen. Dan Bishop (R-Mecklenburg) to a related bill that is still awaiting the governor’s signature. "

Our opinion: Governor should veto Wade’s bill
News & Record // Editorial // July 2, 2017

Summary: "The legislature passed a bill Wednesday, just before midnight, that, if signed into law by Gov. Roy Cooper, would allow the Guilford County Board of Commissioners to take public notices out of newspapers and off newspapers’ websites. Instead, the county’s website would be the repository for notices about such things as government contracts, public meetings, rezoning proposals, foreclosures and unclaimed property."

  • "Sen. Trudy Wade (R-Guilford) was the force behind this. She sponsored Senate Bill 343, which would create a four-county pilot program that included Guilford."
  • "So Wade finally got what she wanted. Some Greensboro Democrats who serve in the House said Wade’s aim was to exact revenge on the News & Record because she is angry about stories and editorials the paper has written"
  • "If Gov. Roy Cooper signs this bill and the commissioners pass an ordinance to move notices to its website, it will do damage to the News & Record."

Our opinion: Wade’s win on public notices is democracy’s loss
Wilson-Times // Editorial // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A senator’s skullduggery could leave a half-million North Carolinians in the dark and pave the way for government secrecy to spread throughout the state."

  • "Sen. Trudy Wade, R-Guilford, should have taken no for an answer when the House Finance Committee shot down her small-minded bid to hide public notices on government websites Wednesday. Instead, she shoehorned the provision into a hijacked House bill.
  • "Rep. Susan Martin, R-Wilson, cast a disappointing vote in favor of the flawed bill."

Gov. Cooper News

NC General Assembly’s session dominated by faceoff with Cooper
N&O // Lynn Bonner // July 1, 2017

Summary: "The legislative session ended much as it began, with the Republican legislature and the Democratic governor locked in a disagreement. The 2017 regular session of the N.C. General Assembly was dominated by vetoes, veto overrides and court hearings in lawsuits Gov. Roy Cooper brought to fight legislative attempts to dilute his powers."

‘Garbage juice’ bill’s fate up in the air after Cooper veto
N&O // Craig Jarvis // July 1, 2017

Summary: "One of the 2017 legislative session’s more vivid bills dealt with what one environmentalist attorney dubbed “garbage juice in a snowblower.”…The bill’s sponsors say it is a safe and cost-effective process, but environmentalists contend it is unproven technology. Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed the bill on Friday."

Cooper signs ‘brunch bill,’ vetoes ‘garbage juice’ spray bill
WRAL // Matthew Burns // June 31, 2017

Summary: "Gov. Roy Cooper on Friday vetoed legislation that would allow landfills to collect the contaminated liquid that leaks from the trash and shoot it up into the air over the dump with giant blowers.Cooper also signed several measures into law, including the so-called "brunch bill" that loosens North Carolina alcohol regulations, including allowing restaurants to serve liquor before noon on Sundays with local approval."

NC will supply public voter data in Trump voter fraud hunt
WRAL // Travis Fain // June 31, 2017

Summary: "North Carolina will comply with a Trump administration request to provide troves of public voter data, a request some states are resisting."

  • ""My staff has told the State Board of Elections that we should not participate in providing sensitive information beyond what is public record as it is unnecessary and because I have concerns that it is an effort to justify the President’s false claims about voter fraud.," Gov. Roy Cooper said in a statement."

Lawmakers enable easier criminal record expunctions
Wilson-Times // Drew C Wilson // July 3, 2017

Summary: "A bill that would change the way expunctions are granted has passed the North Carolina General Assembly and is on Gov. Roy Cooper’s desk. Expunction is a legal process to remove certain offenses from a person’s criminal record."

  • "Reps. John Faircloth, R-Guilford, Sarah Stevens, R-Surry, Rep. Chuck McGrady, R-Henderson, and Rep. Robert T. Reives, D-Lee, filed the companion bill in the House. "

Our view: Confronting opioids
Winston-Salem Journal // Editorial // July 4, 2017

Summary: "Gov. Roy Cooper has signed a legislative act into law that confronts the growing opioid problem in this state….There’s still a need for pain medication — it can’t simply be eliminated — but it must be monitored carefully. This act should help."

  • "“The opioid crisis does not pick Democrats or Republicans as victims,” Cooper has said. “Our solutions should not be that way, either. Our solutions should fix this problem for every single citizen in North Carolina.” We agree. "

Cooper, Stein attend annual meeting for dark money group
WRAL // Travis Fain // June 31, 2017

Summary: "Gov. Roy Cooper and key members of his administration are at an annual meeting this week in Pinehurst for a left-leaning dark money group."

  • "Cooper spokesman Ford Porter said the governor isn’t fundraising. He was due at the conference only for lunch on Friday."The governor is speaking to the conference, and he is not involved in any fundraising," Porter said in an email."

Key Targets News – House

Brenden Jones

(none)

Larry Yarborough

(none)

Mike Clampitt

(none)

John Bradford

(none)

Bill Brawley

(none)

Nelson Dollar

(none)

Chris Malone

(none)

Susan Martin

Our opinion: Wade’s win on public notices is democracy’s loss
Wilson-Times // Editorial // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A senator’s skullduggery could leave a half-million North Carolinians in the dark and pave the way for government secrecy to spread throughout the state."

  • "Sen. Trudy Wade, R-Guilford,should have taken no for an answer when the House Finance Committee shot down her small-minded bid to hide public notices on government websites Wednesday. Instead, she shoehorned the provision into a hijacked House bill.
  • "Rep. Susan Martin, R-Wilson,cast a disappointing vote in favor of the flawed bill."

Gregory Murphy

(none)

John Szoka

Solar compromise passes despite shade
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 31, 2017

Summary: "A compromise bill to overhaul solar policy in North Carolina is on its way to the governor. But critics say wind energy paid too high a price for the deal…The final deal includes an 18-month moratorium – through the end of 2018 – on issuing any state permits for wind farms. No exceptions are made for the Timbermill Wind and Alligator River wind projects currently in development."

  • "Sponsor Rep. John Szoka, R-Cumberland, conceded that it wasn’t the bill that left the House, but he said the solar provisions would still benefit utility customers, adding that "85 percent of something" is better than nothing."

Fayetteville’s lawmakers win some, lose some
Fayetteville Observer // Paul Woolverton // July 1, 2017

Summary: "Cumberland County’s six lawmakers had plenty to celebrate when the “long session” of the General Assembly gaveled out at 2:09 a.m. Friday. After all, they brought millions of dollars for projects in Fayetteville and Cumberland County."

  • "Sen. Wesley Meredith proposed legislation to prepare North Carolina for self-driving vehicles, which are in development."
  • "Szoka passed legislation to modify electric utility regulations to make it more affordable for residents and businesses to install solar power on their properties. "
  • "Cumberland County Rep. John Szoka’s plan to foster rural internet expansion passed the House but is trapped in the Senate."

Stephen Ross

(none)

Andy Dulin

(none)

John Blust

(none)

Jonathan Jordan

(none)

Michele Presnell

(none)

Beverly Boswell

Sand, dredging, bag ban bills left hanging as lawmakers depart
The Outer Banks Voice // Kirk Ross // July 5, 2017

Summary: "Going into the final day of the 2017 long session last week, the fate of dozens of environmental provisions, some in multiple bills, was still an unknown."

  • "Also among the amendments proposed but not yet voted on is a move by Rep. Beverly Boswell, R-Dare, to add a provision to repeal the plastic bag ban in Outer Banks beach communities. "

John Sauls

(none)

Donny Lambeth

It’s status quo for behavioral health managed-care organizations after reforms fail to pass
Winston-Salem // Richard Craver // July 3, 2017

Summary: "As the legislature entered adjournment early Friday, the status quo held solid even after a scathing state audit on the business practices of Cardinal Innovations Healthcare Solutions, the largest of the seven remaining MCOs."

  • "The only MCO bill to reach the floor of both chambers — House Bill 403 in two different versions — remains alive in a concurrence conference awaiting an Aug. 3 specially called regular-day session.Sen. Joyce Krawiec, R-Forsyth, and Rep. Donny Lambeth, R-Forsyth, are two of the six conferees. Lambeth is a leading House expert on health-care issues and former president of N.C. Baptist Hospital.

Linda Hunt Williams

(none)

Scott Stone

(none)

Larry Pittman

(none)

John Faircloth

Lawmakers enable easier criminal record expunctions
Wilson-Times // Drew C Wilson // July 3, 2017

Summary: "A bill that would change the way expunctions are granted has passed the North Carolina General Assembly and is on Gov. Roy Cooper’s desk. Expunction is a legal process to remove certain offenses from a person’s criminal record."

  • "Reps. John Faircloth, R-Guilford, Sarah Stevens, R-Surry, Rep. Chuck McGrady, R-Henderson, and Rep. Robert T. Reives, D-Lee, filed the companion bill in the House. "

Dennis Riddell

Dust settles at West Jones Street, with scores of legislation sent to Cooper’s desk
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 30, 2017

Summary: "After a flurry of activity that began with a veto override, lawmakers adjourned their regular legislative session a little after 2am on Friday morning just ahead of the Independence Day holiday and a looming court order on redistricting."

  • Convention of states – "In April, the Senate initiated the process in a successful bid, but the House version — championed by Reps. Bert Jones (R-Rockingham) and Dennis Riddell (R-Alamance) — fell short when more than a dozen conservative members voted red."

Ted Davis

(none)

John Hardister

(none)

Dana Bumgardner

(none)

Bob Steinburg

(none)

Linda Johnson

(none)

David Lewis

(none)

George Cleveland

(none)

Debra Conrad

(none)

Mark Brody

(none)

Michael Speciale

(none)

Donna White

(none)

Holly Grange

(none)

Bert Jones

(none)

Key Target News – Senate

Tamara Barringer

(none)

John Alexander

(none)

Chad Barefoot

(none)

Wesley Meredith

Fayetteville’s lawmakers win some, lose some
Fayetteville Observer // Paul Woolverton // July 1, 2017

Summary: "Cumberland County’s six lawmakers had plenty to celebrate when the “long session” of the General Assembly gaveled out at 2:09 a.m. Friday. After all, they brought millions of dollars for projects in Fayetteville and Cumberland County."

  • "Sen. Wesley Meredith proposed legislation to prepare North Carolina for self-driving vehicles, which are in development."
  • "Szoka passed legislation to modify electric utility regulations to make it more affordable for residents and businesses to install solar power on their properties. "
  • "Cumberland CountyRep. John Szoka’splan to foster rural internet expansion passed the House but is trapped in the Senate."

Trudy Wade

Our opinion: Governor should veto Wade’s bill
News & Record // Editorial // July 2, 2017

Summary: "The legislature passed a bill Wednesday, just before midnight, that, if signed into law by Gov. Roy Cooper, would allow the Guilford County Board of Commissioners to take public notices out of newspapers and off newspapers’ websites. Instead, the county’s website would be the repository for notices about such things as government contracts, public meetings, rezoning proposals, foreclosures and unclaimed property."

  • "Sen. Trudy Wade (R-Guilford) was the force behind this. She sponsored Senate Bill 343, which would create a four-county pilot program that included Guilford."
  • "So Wade finally got what she wanted. Some Greensboro Democrats who serve in the House said Wade’s aim was to exact revenge on the News & Record because she is angry about stories and editorials the paper has written"
  • "If Gov. Roy Cooper signs this bill and the commissioners pass an ordinance to move notices to its website, it will do damage to the News & Record."

Our opinion: Wade’s win on public notices is democracy’s loss
Wilson-Times // Editorial // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A senator’s skullduggery could leave a half-million North Carolinians in the dark and pave the way for government secrecy to spread throughout the state."

  • "Sen. Trudy Wade, R-Guilford, should have taken no for an answer when the House Finance Committee shot down her small-minded bid to hide public notices on government websites Wednesday. Instead, she shoehorned the provision into a hijacked House bill.
  • "Rep. Susan Martin, R-Wilson, cast a disappointing vote in favor of the flawed bill."

Michael Lee

(none)

Jeff Tarte

(none)

Danny Britt

(none)

Bill Cook

(none)

Dan Bishop

2017 legislative acts that could affect the bottom line
North State Journal // Jeff Moore // June 30, 2017

Summary: " With the long legislative session officially adjourned, lawmakers departed Jones Street having passed a roughly $23 billion budget, overridden half a dozen gubernatorial vetoes, and passed laws that will affect businesses large and small. Tax cuts, regulatory reform, and economic development were among the dozens of legislative acts of 2017 that could translate to the bottom line."

  • "Businesses’ workers’ compensation liabilities were also reformed with an amendment by Sen. Dan Bishop (R-Mecklenburg) to a related bill that is still awaiting the governor’s signature. "

Jim Davis

(none)

NCDP News / Mentions

(none)

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