NCDP Clips 6/30

General Assembly News

Legislature adds extra sessions in August, September as it adjourns regular session
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 29, 2017

Summary: "The adjournment resolution released Thursday evening adds two more legislative sessions this year: One starting on Aug. 3, and another starting on Sept. 6. The regular session ended around 2 a.m. Friday morning, wrapping up six months of lawmaking. A press release from the Senate said it was the “second quickest” long session adjournment since 1973."

State lawmakers adjourn – sort of
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 29, 2017

Summary: " State lawmakers unveiled an adjournment resolution Thursday night that will bring them back to town in August, September and then again by November to draw new legislative districts."

  • "House Rules Chairman David Lewis said the August meeting would be primarily for veto overrides and conference committee reports and that "earnest" work on new legislative maps would likely begin after that."

North Carolina General Assembly Adjourns
WUNC // Jeff Tiberii & AP // June 30, 2017

Summary: "State lawmakers are heading home until August. After reaching a state budget deal, lawmakers passed a flurry of bills this week and departed early this morning. House speaker Tim Moore told reporters the legislature will be "in and out for the rest of the year," which is uncommon, but not unprecedented."

General Assembly ends, but lawmakers return soon, often
News & Record // AP // June 30, 2017

Summary: "The North Carolina General Assembly completed early Friday its primary work session for the year, but not before Republican legislators rolled out a plan to return soon and often to deal with unfinished business, including the replacement of electoral maps."

Avalanche of legislation as lawmakers near end of session
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 29, 2017

Summary: "In a flurry of activity that began with a veto override, lawmakers are moving and negotiating dozens of bills this week in an effort to adjourn ahead of the Independence Day holiday weekend.While most of the legislation was introduced and discussed over the course of the six-month session, new plans and amendments are known to pop up in the final stretch."

General Assembly names redistricting committee ahead of lower court order
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 30, 2017

Summary: "Just before midnight Wednesday, leadership at the North Carolina General Assembly named the lawmakers who will be instrumental in redrafting legislative voting district lines previously thrown out by a federal court for what they deemed were racially gerrymandered maps."

N.C. legislature foundation for 21st century inquisition
WRAL // Editorial // June 30, 2017

Summary: "In the final days of the legislative session – when there should be a priority on getting urgent and critical business done – Committee Chair David Lewis gave a grandstanding soap box to state Rep. Chris Millis. He’s a three-term legislator from Pender County who prides himself on being one of the youngest members of the legislature. His maturity matches his boast."

  • "So, if Millis suspected laws were broken, why hasn’t this been turned over to a prosecutor or state agency, like the SBI, for investigation? Why all the silence after his theatrical March news conference until this week? The answer is abundantly clear. Millis and his enablers in the General Assembly like Lewis and House Speaker Tim Moore, are more interested in sophomoric, hyper-partisan theatrics than dealing seriously with making North Carolina a better place."

Impeachment probe of Secretary of State Marshall unlikely before session ends
N&O // Craig Jarvis // June 29, 2017

Summary: "The N.C. House is unlikely to act on a request to investigate Secretary of State Elaine Marshall before this legislative session ends, the legislator who is pursuing potential impeachment proceedings against her said Thursday evening. But Rep. Chris Millis, a Republican from Hampstead, said his efforts will continue during the interim between legislative sessions, along with an independent probe that he has alluded to."

Republican move to impeach Secretary of State Elaine Marshall is blatantly political
N&O // Editorial // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Republicans in the General Assembly are now pulling one of their more outrageous stunts since taking control of the legislature in 2011. It sounds like a cliche, but it’s true in this case: In threatening to impeach Marshall on a bogus claim, Republicans ought to be ashamed of themselves. It would be redundant to say they’ve gone too far this time, because they’ve gone too far many times."

N.C. Republicans overreaching on Marshall
StarNews // Editorial // June 30, 2017

Summary: "Why doesn’t the N.C. General Assembly just go ahead and make it illegal to be a Democrat?Republican leaders mercilessly hacked the budgets of Gov. Roy Cooper and Attorney General Josh Stein, both confessed D’s. Now, it looks as if they want to impeach Secretary of State Elaine Marshall. The House Rules Committee, on a party-line vote, ordered an investigation as the first step."

House: Marshall impeachment probe will have to wait
WRAL // Travis Fain // June 29, 2017

Summary: "A formal House inquiry into Secretary of State Elaine Marshall’s office’s designation of notaries public won’t come to the chamber floor Thursday, placing the formal proceedings that many Republican members endorsed earlier this week on hold. The issue isn’t going away, though."

After deadly accident, zip lines likely face new insurance requirements
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Operators of zip line attractions could face new insurance requirements under a bill headed to Gov. Roy Cooper’s desk.The N.C. Senate took a final, unanimous vote Thursday on Senate Bill 100, titled “Aerial Adventure Financial Responsibility.” It would require operators of zip lines, challenge courses and similar facilities to carry a liability insurance policy that covers up to $1 million per incident or a total of $2 million."

Wind energy moratorium reduced to 18 months in compromise bill
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A proposed ban on wind energy projects for four years has been reduced to an 18-month moratorium under a compromise renewable energy bill that passed the House and Senate early Friday morning."

  • “It does not mean that a wind facility cannot submit all their paperwork to (the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality), and it doesn’t mean that DEQ cannot work on that paperwork,” said Rep. John Szoka, a Fayetteville Republican. “It takes many years for a wind facility to be licensed."

Solar compromise passes despite shade
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A compromise bill to overhaul solar policy in North Carolina is on its way to the governor. But critics say wind energy paid too high a price for the deal."

  • "Sponsor Rep. John Szoka, R-Cumberland, conceded that it wasn’t the bill that left the House, but he said the solar provisions would still benefit utility customers, adding that "85 percent of something" is better than nothing."

Blow to wind power softened as legislators OK deal on solar reform bill
Charlotte Business Journal // John Downey // June 29, 2017

Summary: "In votes late Thursday , the House Senate agreed to restore the solar compromise provisions of a reform bill on renewables regulation and cut a proposed wind moratorium from four years to one."

Legislature adjourns after passing solar changes and other bills
WFAE // AP // June 30, 2017

Summary: "The North Carolina General Assembly completed its primary work session for the year early Friday morning, but not before Republican legislators rolled out a plan to return soon and often to deal with unfinished business, including the replacement of electoral maps."

  • "Kannapolis, a city once marred by the shuttering of textile mills, is set to become a leader of the emerging food manufacturing sector thanks to a $5 million budget provision and the research of the agricultural program at North Carolina State University.The budget, approved Wednesday after the General Assembly overrode Gov. Cooper’s veto, provides $4.4 million to equip the Food Processing Innovation Center.

NC legislature rejects effort to join constitutional convention movement
N&O // Craig Jarvis, Brian Murphy, Colin Campbell // June 29, 2017

Summary: "In a protracted argument mostly among Republicans, the state House on Thursday narrowly voted against requesting a national convention to make changes to the U.S. Constitution."

  • "Sen. Bert Jones of Reidsville argued for it, saying 12 other states have formally requested a convention of the states."
  • "Jones said of all the hundreds of bills filed in the General Assembly this year “none are more important to the health of nation than this one.”"
  • "Rep. Michael Speciale, a conservative Republican from New Bern, was among the House members who warned that there were dangers of holding such a convention because it could be expanded beyond its original purposes. He said it should be used only as a last resort."

Push for constitutional convention not quite dead
WRAL // Matthew Burns // June 29, 2017

Summary: "The state Senate passed a resolution in April to make North Carolina the 13th state calling for a constitutional convention. After an hour of debate Thursday afternoon that included historical references to the Founding Fathers, dystopian visions of a nation drowning in red ink and a comparison of the Constitution to a microwave, the House voted the idea down 53-59. About six hours later, however, the House voted 66-45 to reconsider the bill, and it was immediately shunted off to the House Rules Committee, where it could resurface at some later date during the biennium."

  • "Rep. Michael Speciale, R-Craven, warned that a convention could lead to unintended consequences. The delegates will be able to set their own agenda and could devise amendments no one has envisioned, he said."
  • "One amendment could fundamentally alter your rights," Speciale said. "The question is not that we have a problem, but is the Constitution the problem and we need to open it up for a rewrite?"

NC Conservative PAC apologizes for lewd tweets
N&O // Aaron Moody // June 29, 2017

Summary: "A political action committee with ties to N.C. House Republicans rebooted its Twitter after blaming a former volunteer for anti-gay and sexist slurs directed at House Democrats and a staff attorney for the legislature.The N.C. Conservatives Political Action Committee issued an apology Thursday morning – on Twitter, naturally – for the Tweets, which initially mentioned House minority leader Darren Jackson and fellow Rep. Pricey Harrison."

Sunday hunting, nonprofit gambling bills pass NC legislature
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 30, 2017

Summary: "Two controversial bills that loosen rules for Sunday hunting and nonprofit “game night” events cleared the legislature late Thursday night and are heading to the governor’s desk."

  • “We’ve got ourselves a really good bill now that will certainly help our young people be more involved with the outdoor sports,” said Sen. John Alexander, a Raleigh Republican and sponsor of the bill.

Lawmakers expand gambling, hunting in final hours of session
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 29, 2017

Summary: " In the waning hours of session Thursday, state lawmakers sent Gov. Roy Cooper measures that would expand Sunday hunting and allow "casino nights" with alcohol for charities and other groups."

Sunday hunting expansion keeps church carve-out
News & Record // AP // June 29, 2017

Summary: "A General Assembly agreement to expand Sunday hunting with firearms privileges in North Carolina will leave in place a prohibition to shoot when most churches meet."

Cameras could catch drivers passing school buses – and lead to a hefty fine
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Similar to red light cameras, Senate Bill 55 would allow school districts to install cameras on buses or contract with a company that offers the service. Drivers caught on camera illegally passing a bus would owe a fine of $400 for the first offense, $750 for the second offense and $1,000 on the third offense. They could appeal the ticket in court."

Lawmakers OK school bus cameras, fines
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Senate Bill 55 would allow counties to install and use video cameras on school buses to catch drivers who don’t obey stop arms. The counties would be allowed to enact non-criminal ordinances to fine a driver $400 for the first offense, $750 for the second and $1,000 for the third."

  • "The North Carolina Supreme Court said no, you can’t do that," argued Rep. David Rogers, R-Rutherford. "You’re basically buying your way out of prosecution."Rep. John Faircloth, R-Guilford, a retired police chief, agreed.
  • "If the evidence is not sufficient to support prosecution, you put it through this other way calling for a lesser standard, and the person gets a civil ticket," said Faircloth, "and the cost of that ticket is probably higher than they would pay if they went to court."
  • "Rep. Greg Murphy, R-Pitt, reminded lawmakers that the program is completely optional for counties."

Richard Petty wins again, this time in the new NC budget
N&O // Will Doran // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Richard Petty, who earned his royal nickname for his dominance in NASCAR, runs a custom car shop in Randolph County that will get $250,000 in renovations paid for by the state government in the next year."

Judges face hard task in NC school power struggle
Citizen-Times // Jonathan Drew // June 30, 2017

Summary: "Judges deciding a dispute over how North Carolina’s schools are run said Thursday that they face a difficult task in ruling on the power balance between legislators, the state school board and the statewide superintendent."

Tar Heel View: Victims of state sterilization should be payed
Richmond County Daily Journal // Editorial // June 29, 2017

Summary: "For almost two years now, victims of North Carolina’s forced sterilization program who qualified for compensation have been waiting for their third and final payment. With almost all appeals exhausted, that time may rightly be here." Gov. Cooper News

Our View: State flood aid arrives
Fayetteville Observer // Editorial // June 30, 2017

Summary: "Gov. Roy Cooper brought good news to Robeson County Wednesday: $70 million in disaster assistance from the state. The money will help finance the beleaguered county’s recovery from the horrific flooding caused by last fall’s Hurricane Matthew."

Nonprofits Receive Grants for Hurricane Recovery
Goldsboro Daily News // Ken Conners // June 30, 2017

Summary: "Nonprofits operating in 13 hard-hit North Carolina counties will get $810,000 to help volunteers rebuild homes damaged by Hurricane Matthew. Governor Roy Cooper announced the grants while visiting a flood-damaged home in Lumberton that was rebuilt by volunteers with the United Methodist Church."

Cooper signs STOP act into law
Daily Reflector // Ginger Livingston // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A rare show of bipartisan unity played out in the state’s historic capitol building Thursday as Gov. Roy Cooper signed into law legislation to combat opioid abuse."

  • “A lot of different people came together to combat a societal problem,” Murphy said. “This is the way government should work: it was done in a bipartisan matter, different branches of government worked together against a common enemy. I’m very proud to have been the lead sponsor.”

Governor signs STOP Act opioid bill into law
Winston-Salem Journal // Richard Craver // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Bills addressing opioid regulations, deaf motorists and educational recognition of learning disabilities have cleared the General Assembly and are headed to Gov. Roy Cooper for his signature."

  • "House Bill 149, sponsored by Rep. Debra Conrad, R-Forsyth, requires the State Board of Education and local education boards to develop tools for ensuring policies and procedures are developed for students with learning disabilities, such as dyslexia and dyscalculia."
  • “It is important to be able to identify students with these learning disabilities early, so they can have the most fulfilling education possible,” Conrad said.

Gov. Cooper signs bill aimed at curbing state’s opioid crisis
Spectrum News // Staff // June 29, 2017
Summary: "Gov. Roy Cooper signed a new bill aimed to curb the state’s opioid crisis.The stop act or "Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention Act" addresses prescribing opioids and dispensing drugs." Key Targets News – House

Brenden Jones

(none)

Larry Yarborough

(none)

Mike Clampitt

(none)

John Bradford

For-Profit Charter Operator Lobbies for Workplace Schools
WUNC // AP // June 29, 2017

Summary: "As profit-driven charter school management companies seek growth opportunities, one of the country’s largest for-profit firms is lobbying North Carolina legislators to create a new market for a type of school only rarely attempted."

  • "No companies have yet expressed interest in spending the minimum of $50,000 to get a North Carolina charter school off the ground for their workers, said state Rep. John Bradford, a suburban Charlotte Republican who sponsored legislation that passed the House earlier this year."
  • "Bradford told The Associated Press that he doesn’t know much about how similar laws have worked in other states. He said the legislation was brought to him by charter school advocates including a lobbyist for Charter Schools USA. "

Bill Brawley

(none)

Nelson Dollar

(none)

Chris Malone

(none)

Susan Martin

Pinetops broadband gets new life
Wilson-Times // Brie Handgraaf // June 29, 2017

Summary: Once signed by Gov. Roy Cooper, House Bill 396 will allow Greenlight Community Broadband to resume billing more than 200 customers beyond the county line with the acknowledgement that municipal service will stop 30 days after a competitive provider connects to Greenlight’s customers in rural Nash and Edgecombe counties. "

  • “The city of Wilson, Greenlight and, especially citizens in the temporary expansion area who have been at risk of being disconnected, would have preferred the original version of the bill I filed, which proposed permanently expanding the exemption for the city of Wilson to include the municipality of Pinetops and Vick Farms,” Rep. Susan Martin said in a statement. “Private-sector communications providers and many legislators, who were engaged in the level playing field H129 deliberations in 2011, strongly opposed any expansion considering the clear direction provided by the legislature and the poor financial performance of many municipal broadband systems. Greenlight, a successful and financially sound municipal broadband system with excellent service, is the exception, not the norm.”
  • "There have been many discussions this session about the need to improve rural broadband access and proposals for additional public-private partnerships,” Martin said. “Accepting this compromise allows Greenlight to continue serving the areas in question, charge for the services provided and continue discussions with other providers about potential partnerships.”

Gregory Murphy

Lawmakers OK school bus cameras, fines
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Senate Bill 55 would allow counties to install and use video cameras on school buses to catch drivers who don’t obey stop arms. The counties would be allowed to enact non-criminal ordinances to fine a driver $400 for the first offense, $750 for the second and $1,000 for the third."

  • "The North Carolina Supreme Court said no, you can’t do that," argued Rep. David Rogers, R-Rutherford. "You’re basically buying your way out of prosecution."Rep. John Faircloth, R-Guilford, a retired police chief, agreed.
  • "If the evidence is not sufficient to support prosecution, you put it through this other way calling for a lesser standard, and the person gets a civil ticket," said Faircloth, "and the cost of that ticket is probably higher than they would pay if they went to court."
  • "Rep. Greg Murphy, R-Pitt, reminded lawmakers that the program is completely optional for counties."

Cooper signs STOP act into law
Daily Reflector // Ginger Livingston // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A rare show of bipartisan unity played out in the state’s historic capitol building Thursday as Gov. Roy Cooper signed into law legislation to combat opioid abuse."

  • “A lot of different people came together to combat a societal problem,” Murphy said. “This is the way government should work: it was done in a bipartisan matter, different branches of government worked together against a common enemy. I’m very proud to have been the lead sponsor.”

John Szoka

Wind energy moratorium reduced to 18 months in compromise bill
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A proposed ban on wind energy projects for four years has been reduced to an 18-month moratorium under a compromise renewable energy bill that passed the House and Senate early Friday morning."

  • “It does not mean that a wind facility cannot submit all their paperwork to (the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality), and it doesn’t mean that DEQ cannot work on that paperwork,” said Rep. John Szoka, a Fayetteville Republican. “It takes many years for a wind facility to be licensed.”

Solar compromise passes despite shade
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A compromise bill to overhaul solar policy in North Carolina is on its way to the governor. But critics say wind energy paid too high a price for the deal."

  • "Sponsor Rep. John Szoka, R-Cumberland, conceded that it wasn’t the bill that left the House, but he said the solar provisions would still benefit utility customers, adding that "85 percent of something" is better than nothing."

Stephen Ross

(none)

Andy Dulin

(none)

John Blust

(none)

Jonathan Jordan

(none)

Michele Presnell

(none)

Beverly Boswell

(none)

John Sauls

(none)

Donny Lambeth

NC bill pushed by Guilford state rep described as ‘lawmaking at its worst’
Winston-Salem Journal // Richard craber // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A compromise on House Bill 205 gives Guilford County the option to participate in a solo pilot program in which it could post its legal notices on the county website as well as publish non-county legal notices for fees ranging from $10 to $450."

  • "The compromise also eliminates a worker’s compensation exception for newspaper carriers that has been state law for 20 years.
    Both elements were co-opted into HB205 by Sen. Trudy Wade, R-Guilford."
  • "Wade said on the Senate floor Wednesday that the compromise “treats newspaper employees as every other employee in the state.” "
  • “We know the core of it is Sen. Wade going after the News & Record, but we are caught up in the mix,” Womack said. The News & Record is a sister publication of the Winston-Salem Journal.
  • "Rep. Donny Lambeth, R-Forsyth, said he voted against the compromise “in part because of the way it has been handled and in part because it is simply a bad bill and appears to not be well thought out and involved stakeholders across the state.”"

Linda Hunt Williams

(none)

Scott Stone

(none)

Larry Pittman

(none)

John Faircloth

Lawmakers OK school bus cameras, fines
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Senate Bill 55 would allow counties to install and use video cameras on school buses to catch drivers who don’t obey stop arms. The counties would be allowed to enact non-criminal ordinances to fine a driver $400 for the first offense, $750 for the second and $1,000 for the third."

  • "The North Carolina Supreme Court said no, you can’t do that," argued Rep. David Rogers, R-Rutherford. "You’re basically buying your way out of prosecution."Rep. John Faircloth, R-Guilford, a retired police chief, agreed.
  • "If the evidence is not sufficient to support prosecution, you put it through this other way calling for a lesser standard, and the person gets a civil ticket," said Faircloth, "and the cost of that ticket is probably higher than they would pay if they went to court."
  • "Rep. Greg Murphy, R-Pitt, reminded lawmakers that the program is completely optional for counties."

Dennis Riddell

(none)

Ted Davis

(none)

John Hardister

(none)

Dana Bumgardner

(none)

Bob Steinburg

(none)

Linda Johnson

(none)

David Lewis

State lawmakers adjourn – sort of
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 29, 2017

Summary: " State lawmakers unveiled an adjournment resolution Thursday night that will bring them back to town in August, September and then again by November to draw new legislative districts."

  • "House Rules Chairman David Lewis said the August meeting would be primarily for veto overrides and conference committee reports and that "earnest" work on new legislative maps would likely begin after that."

George Cleveland

(none)

Debra Conrad

Governor signs STOP Act opioid bill into law
Winston-Salem Journal // Richard Craver // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Bills addressing opioid regulations, deaf motorists and educational recognition of learning disabilities have cleared the General Assembly and are headed to Gov. Roy Cooper for his signature."

  • "House Bill 149, sponsored by Rep. Debra Conrad, R-Forsyth, requires the State Board of Education and local education boards to develop tools for ensuring policies and procedures are developed for students with learning disabilities, such as dyslexia and dyscalculia."
  • “It is important to be able to identify students with these learning disabilities early, so they can have the most fulfilling education possible,” Conrad said.

Mark Brody

(none)

Michael Speciale

NC legislature rejects effort to join constitutional convention movement
N&O // Craig Jarvis, Brian Murphy, Colin Campbell // June 29, 2017

Summary: "In a protracted argument mostly among Republicans, the state House on Thursday narrowly voted against requesting a national convention to make changes to the U.S. Constitution."

  • "Sen. Bert Jones of Reidsville argued for it, saying 12 other states have formally requested a convention of the states."
  • "Jonessaid of all the hundreds of bills filed in the General Assembly this year “none are more important to the health of nation than this one.”"
  • "Rep. Michael Speciale, a conservative Republican from New Bern, was among the House members who warned that there were dangers of holding such a convention because it could be expanded beyond its original purposes. He said it should be used only as a last resort."

Push for constitutional convention not quite dead
WRAL // Matthew Burns // June 29, 2017

Summary: "The state Senate passed a resolution in April to make North Carolina the 13th state calling for a constitutional convention. After an hour of debate Thursday afternoon that included historical references to the Founding Fathers, dystopian visions of a nation drowning in red ink and a comparison of the Constitution to a microwave, the House voted the idea down 53-59. About six hours later, however, the House voted 66-45 to reconsider the bill, and it was immediately shunted off to the House Rules Committee, where it could resurface at some later date during the biennium."

  • "Rep. Michael Speciale, R-Craven, warned that a convention could lead to unintended consequences. The delegates will be able to set their own agenda and could devise amendments no one has envisioned, he said."
  • "One amendment could fundamentally alter your rights," Speciale said. "The question is not that we have a problem, but is the Constitution the problem and we need to open it up for a rewrite?"

Donna White

(none)

Holly Grange

(none)

Bert Jones

NC legislature rejects effort to join constitutional convention movement
N&O // Craig Jarvis, Brian Murphy, Colin Campbell // June 29, 2017

Summary: "In a protracted argument mostly among Republicans, the state House on Thursday narrowly voted against requesting a national convention to make changes to the U.S. Constitution."

  • "Sen. Bert Jones of Reidsville argued for it, saying 12 other states have formally requested a convention of the states."
  • "Jones said of all the hundreds of bills filed in the General Assembly this year “none are more important to the health of nation than this one.”"
  • "Rep. Michael Speciale, a conservative Republican from New Bern, was among the House members who warned that there were dangers of holding such a convention because it could be expanded beyond its original purposes. He said it should be used only as a last resort."

Key Target News – Senate

Tamara Barringer

(none)

John Alexander

Sunday hunting, nonprofit gambling bills pass NC legislature
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 30, 2017

Summary: "Two controversial bills that loosen rules for Sunday hunting and nonprofit “game night” events cleared the legislature late Thursday night and are heading to the governor’s desk."

  • “We’ve got ourselves a really good bill now that will certainly help our young people be more involved with the outdoor sports,” said Sen. John Alexander, a Raleigh Republican and sponsor of the bill.

Chad Barefoot

(none)

Wesley Meredith

(none)

Trudy Wade

NC bill pushed by Guilford state rep described as ‘lawmaking at its worst’
Winston-Salem Journal // Richard craber // June 30, 2017

Summary: "A compromise on House Bill 205 gives Guilford County the option to participate in a solo pilot program in which it could post its legal notices on the county website as well as publish non-county legal notices for fees ranging from $10 to $450."

  • "The compromise also eliminates a worker’s compensation exception for newspaper carriers that has been state law for 20 years.
    Both elements were co-opted into HB205 by Sen. Trudy Wade, R-Guilford."
  • "Wade said on the Senate floor Wednesday that the compromise “treats newspaper employees as every other employee in the state.” "
  • “We know the core of it is Sen. Wade going after the News & Record, but we are caught up in the mix,” Womack said. The News & Record is a sister publication of the Winston-Salem Journal.
  • "Rep. Donny Lambeth, R-Forsyth, said he voted against the compromise “in part because of the way it has been handled and in part because it is simply a bad bill and appears to not be well thought out and involved stakeholders across the state.”"

Michael Lee

(none

Jeff Tarte

(none)

Danny Britt

Britt: Robeson in line for a ‘lot’ of Matthew aid
Robesonian // Mike Gellatly // June 30, 2017

Summary: "Robeson County is in line to receive “a lot” of the $100 million earmarked in the recently approved North Carolina budget for continued cleanup and rebuilding from Hurricane Matthew and other disasters, according to a local senator."

  • “Lumberton is going to get a lot of money, Fair Bluff is going to get a lot of money,” said Sen. Danny Britt, one of three sponsors of the bill. “We came out really well.”

Bill Cook

Senate passes Marine Aquaculture Development Act
WECT // Staff // June 29, 2017

Summary: "Senate Bill 410, the Marine Aquaculture Development Act, was sponsored by Sen. Bill Cook (R-District 1), Sen. Norman W. Sanderson (R-District 2) and Sen. Jerry W. Tillman (R-District 29). The bill will next be sent to Gov. Roy Cooper"

  • "Marine aquaculture is one of the fastest growing food production methods in the world, and SB 410 is designed to attract global seafood companies to the state, according to a Thursday afternoon news release."

Dan Bishop

(none)

Jim Davis

(none)

NCDP News / Mentions

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