NCDP Clips 6/20

General Assembly

NC state budget deal include raises for state employees, teachers
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 19, 2017

Summary: “A compromise North Carolina state budget would give teachers an average pay raise of 3.3 percent in the coming year, and would raise most other state employees’ pay by a flat $1,000.”

Income tax cuts postponed until 2019 in NC budget compromise
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 19, 2017

Summary: “The final budget compromise announced by House and Senate leaders Monday would sharply cut personal and corporate income taxes – but the new rates won’t kick in until 2019.”

Some provisions in final budget new, others familiar
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The final budget deal released just before midnight Monday contains an array of special provisions, some of which weren’t included in either the House or the Senate budget proposals.In the past, the standard for final budget provisions has been that they had to have been included in one of the two earlier legislative plans. But that rule was often more honored in the breach, as it appears to be in this year’s $23 billion spending plan

Educators get raises in $23B budget deal
WRAL // Matthew Burns and Laura Leslie // June 19, 2017

Summary: “State lawmakers have negotiated a $23 billion spending plan for 2017-18 that includes raises for teachers and state employees, a cost-of-living adjustment for retirees and tax cuts for individuals and businesses.”

North Carolina budget agreement raises salaries, delays tax cuts
WBT // AP // June 20, 2017

Summary: ” Republicans at the North Carolina General Assembly announced Monday a two-year state budget deal that gives raises to teachers, state employees and retirees next year but puts off income tax breaks until 2019.”

State budget compromise unveils big plans for tax cuts, but not until 2019
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 20, 2017

Summary: “After only two weeks of closed door negotiations, Republican lawmakers introduced their state budget compromise on Monday. The $22.9 billion biennium budget appears to include significant personal and corporate tax cuts, incremental pay raises for teachers, and a large deposit into the state rainy day fund.”

  • “I want to thank all those who worked really exceptionally hard, I think we have a really good relationship — we spent a lot of time together, know each other a little bit better, and we’re happy with the results,” House budget chair Nelson Dollar (R-Wake) said.
  • “Looking at the bigger issue, when you go back in history when you saw budget increases of 8, 9, 10 percent, those simply were not sustainable,” said Dollar. “Funds weren’t being saved back then, and you come to the great recession and our state was in just a horrendous situation. We never really want to be there again.”

Legislative leaders roll out final $23B state budget proposal
The Outer Banks Voice // Sam Walker // June 19, 2017

Summary: “Republican legislative leaders on Monday rolled out their final proposed $23 billion state government budget for the next two years, touting increases in teacher and state employee pay and a reduction in the state’s personal income tax rate.”

NC Legislative Leaders Announce Budget Deal
WUNC // Jeff Tiberii // June 19, 2017

Summary: “Republican state lawmakers are touting their final budget plan, which they say cuts taxes, provides teacher raises, and grows government spending by about 3 percent. Critics, including Democratic Governor Roy Cooper, say the plan fails to keep up with the growth of population and inflation.”

Rev. Barber’s ban from the NC Legislative Building is an embarrassment to the state
N&O // Editorial // June 19, 2017

Summary: “Just days after his appearance on the front page of The New York Times as one of the country’s leading liberal religious leaders, the Rev. William Barber was back on other front pages, this time because of an outrageous and likely unconstitutional ban from the North Carolina Legislative Building.”

  • “This is a preposterous act of excess on the part of the General Assembly’s police force.”
  • “The logic is ridiculous and high-handed. The Legislative Building belongs to the people. If Barber and others are involved in a peaceful protest, they may be subject to charges, but to ban them from the building is almost certainly unconstitutional. “
  • “The ban won’t stand, except perhaps as a petty, petulant, childish, humiliating example of bullying by people who ought to know better.”

House OKs retraining course for driver’s license suspensions
WRAL // Matthew Burns // June 19, 2017

Summary: “The House on Monday approved a proposal to require drivers whose licenses are suspended for moving violations to attend and pass a driver retraining program to get their licenses reinstated.”
US Supreme Court strikes down NC sex offender social media ban
N&O // Anne Blythe // June 19, 2017

Summary: “The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned a North Carolina law prohibiting registered sex offenders from using Facebook or other social networking sites that minors can join”

  • “This case is one of the first this Court has taken to address the relationship between the First Amendment and the modern Internet,” Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the majority opinion. “As a result, the Court must exercise extreme caution before suggesting that the First Amendment provides scant protection for access to vast networks in that medium.”

Orange County impact fees
WRAL // Laura Leslie // June 19, 2017

Summary: “The state Senate gave final approval Monday night to repealing Orange County’s power to impose impact fees on development to pay for schools and other public facilities. House Bill 406 takes effect immediately. It is a local bill, so it’s not subject to the governor’s approval or veto.”

Second Senate committee to address bill targeting opioid treatment, prevention
Winston-Salem Journal // Richard Craver // June 19, 2017

Summary: “The second state Senate committee will address a bipartisan House bill that is focused on tightening opioid regulations.House Bill 243, known as the STOP Act, is sponsored by Republican lawmakers and Democratic Attorney General Josh Stein. The bill passed 114-0 on April 10.The Senate Health committee recommended approval of the bill Thursday. The Senate committee on Rules and Operations will address it at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday.”

North Carolina becomes last state to ‘raise the age’, won’t try 16-year-olds as adults
WCNC // June 19, 2017

Summary: “Most 16- and 17-year-olds charged with crimes in North Carolina will no longer be treated as adults in the criminal justice system under the budget announced Monday by the North Carolina General Assembly.”
Gov. Cooper News

Is North Carolina the Future of American Politics?
NYT Magazine // Jason Zengerle // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Welcome to North Carolina circa 2017, where all the passions and pathologies of American politics writ large are played out writ small — and with even more intensity. Ever since 2010, when Republicans seized control of the General Assembly for the first time in a century, and especially since 2012, when they took the governor’s mansion, the state’s politics have been haywire.”

  • “In just a few years, North Carolina Republicans have not just run quickly through the conservative policy checklist; they’ve tried to permanently skew the balance of power in the state in their favor”
  • “Then, before Cooper was even sworn in, the General Assembly — in which Republicans had retained their decisive majority in November — tried to strip him of many of his executive powers.”
  • “In the meantime, Cooper, hamstrung as he is by the General Assembly, has managed to maneuver his way to a handful of quiet victories.”

Governor Cooper heads to Windsor to discuss hurricane recovery efforts
WITN // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Another town in the east is welcoming Governor Roy Cooper, as he checks in on Hurricane Matthew recovery efforts.Gov. Cooper will meet with local officials in Windsor on the recovery efforts Tuesday.”
State budget compromise unveils big plans for tax cuts, but not until 2019
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 20, 2017

Summary: “After only two weeks of closed door negotiations, Republican lawmakers introduced their state budget compromise on Monday. The $22.9 billion biennium budget appears to include significant personal and corporate tax cuts, incremental pay raises for teachers, and a large deposit into the state rainy day fund.”

  • “I want to thank all those who worked really exceptionally hard, I think we have a really good relationship — we spent a lot of time together, know each other a little bit better, and we’re happy with the results,” House budget chair Nelson Dollar (R-Wake) said.
  • “Looking at the bigger issue, when you go back in history when you saw budget increases of 8, 9, 10 percent, those simply were not sustainable,” said Dollar. “Funds weren’t being saved back then, and you come to the great recession and our state was in just a horrendous situation. We never really want to be there again.”

NCDP News / Mentions

The NCGA has a budget and other things you need to know today
INDY Week // Jeffrey Billman // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Yesterday, the General Assembly unveiled its $23 billion compromise budget, which would boost teacher pay by 3.3 percent and give other employees a $1,000 raise. State retirees would get a 1 percent cost-of-living adjustment, and while there are tax cuts—the personal income tax would drop from 5.499 percent to 5.25 percent, the corporate tax cut would drop from 3 percent to 2.5 percent, and the standard deduction for married couples would increase from $17,500 to $20,000—they won’t take effect until 2019.”

  • N.C. Democratic Party chairman Wayne Goodwin: “At first glance, it’s clear the General Assembly has chosen yet again to help those who need it least at the expense of our public services.”

State Budget meets with mixed Reviews
NCNN // Bruce Ferrell // June 20, 2017

Summary:”The compromise budget rolled out by the General Assembly is meeting with predictably mixed reviews. Republicans and conservatives say is it a common-sense proposal which provides increases in teacher pay, tax breaks to boost the economy and provides more to save for a rainy day. Democrats and progressives say it gives too much to rich and hurts the poor.”

  • “But, those on the other side of the isle said more could be done to help those in need. “At first glance, it’s clear the General Assembly has chosen yet again to help those who need it least at the expense of our public services. Our state should prioritize substantive raises for our teachers, meaningful economic development, and tangible investments in the middle class, not even more tax giveaways that disproportionately help the wealthy and corporations,” said state Democratic Party Wayne Goodwin.

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